September 6, 2016

Round-Up: Actress 1949





5. Loretta Young, Come to the Stable


4. Susan Hayward, My Foolish Heart



3. Jeanne Crain, Pinky



2. Deborah Kerr, Edward, My Son



1. OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND, THE HEIRESS



IN CONCLUSION: To the surprise of just about no one, Olivia de Havilland takes the win (and second consecutive victory to boot) to close out the 1940s. Hers is a very great performance, though not quite one that I'm over the moon about. Still, it's a solid albeit fitting end to a volatile decade's worth of actressing. Regarding the remaining placements: Loretta Young never stood a chance with me considering her character and film's subject matter and Susan Hayward was more dull than expected (though not surprisingly so). I think the only surprise here was the fact that I liked Pinky / Jeanne Crain as much as I did. I toyed with the thought of giving Crain second place to de Havilland, but upon further reflection, I had to concede to the fact that while Crain's was a heavier part to bear, she just did not have the talent to match it, and often comes off as not trying at all. Kerr on the other hand actually tries (and tries real damn hard) and has some moments that are more superior to anything Crain achieves.

SIXTH PLACE: As with the actors - it's hard to say. Though I imagine that a lady from A Letter to Three Wives must have been in the running. With Crain getting much of her attention on a separate prestige picture, I think that leaves us with either Ann Sothern or Linda Darnell in the sixth spot. Perhaps voters were split as to whom deserved it most?

Taking a look at the films from that year, there are some alternate choices to be considered. Katharine Hepburn in Adam's Rib could have been an option. Oscar favorite Ingrid Bergman could have been in the running if Under Capricorn didn't flop as much as it did. Jennifer Jones had Madame Bovary and Ginger Rogers had The Barkleys of Broadway. The New York Film Critics Circle seemed to have paid Edith Evans some attention for Women of Dolwyn and The Queen of Spades, though it doesn't seem as though either were realistically on Oscar's radar. Further, could June Allyson have landed some attention for Little Women? Or Patricia Neal for The Fountainhead, considering her adjacent presence that year in The Hasty Heart?

WHAT'S NEXT: We. Are. Officially. Done. With. The. 1940's!!! As was the case with the closing of 1927-1939, I'll be writing up some postmortem thoughts within the next month. Hallelujah to all!

8 comments:

  1. I'm surprised Crain is 3rd! Anyway, 1950 is a wonderful, wonderful year!

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    1. I can't wait :) Been excited about it since I wrote up 1940...

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  2. Your rankings are identical to mine. I think 1949 is one of the weakest years for actress nominees. Only de Havilland gave an award-worthy performance; the others didn't even deserve nominations, in my opinion. I would have gone with Jones or Hepburn over any of them.

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    1. Thanks for your thoughts! I'm trying to figure out whether or not I want to sit through Madame Bovary...

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  3. Also, I suggest you to see Setsuko Hara's performance in Late Spring from 1949, she's fantastic and the movie is wonderful.

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    1. I'll add that to my to-watch list :)

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  4. I actually have to agree with you about De Havilland - really great, but I can never understand why she is considered one of the best winners in this category. I also found her earlier scenes a bit mannered, although that would have suited the character well I guess.

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    1. I'm happy we both agree! She gets so much praise so I do feel a little odd feeling less than absolutely enthused by her, so glad to know there're others out there that feel the same.

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